Early Summer 2011 - Issue #69
 
Can You Make More Money with Frank Schilling?

Frank Schilling’s new InternetTraffic.com service claims to help you make more money than other parking companies.  He is apparently using some of the same techniques he uses on his own domains, and reports I've read suggest that the domains can contain both Google feeds and Yahoo/Bing feeds.

At first glance this seems to violate the terms of service of these companies, but Frank is such a big customer he may get a pass(?)  Domain owners who have been allowed in report getting an income boost, but it's too soon to see how long this will last.  Lots of companies give a boost at first and then domain owners find that income

 
Avoid Google Docs on Domains you may Drop

Ben Reyes is  22 year old British "entrepreneur, developer and hacker" who discovered how to access the complete email history of the previous owner of a domain.  With this information he also accessed the person's Amazon account and has access to all sorts of aspects of the former owner's identity.  It seems that Google gives you access to the former owner's Google Apps GMail account if you can prove you are the current owner.  You now have access to all of their old emails.  

Read his post Don't Let Your Domains Expire with Google Apps for all of the details.  Most domain developers won't be using Google Apps on domains that they will allow to expire.  This is an issue primarily if you change brands for your business.   Don't ever abandon a Google Apps account. 

 
When is an Incentive Plan not an Incentive Plan?

Monte Cahn, a domain pioneer and founder of domain registrar Moniker, has sued Oversee.net over the terms of a a $13 million incentive plan that Oversee never paid.  Oversee apparently claims that Cahn failed to meet the terms of the incentive plan, while Cahn contents that Oversee shifted his responsibilities in such a way that it was impossible for him to meet the terms of the plan.  You can read the entire filing here.

Cahn had actually sold Moniker to Seevast in 2005. Oversee.net apparently approached Seevast in 2007 with an offer to buy the business.   Cahn's complaint alleges that the companies agreed to a purchase price of 35 million dollars, but Oversee required that  Cahn commit to join Oversee.net for at least three years.  The alleged "Management Incentive Plan" of up to 13 million dollars was apparently one of the major reasons for Cahn to join the company. The papers filed report that Cahn would also receive 300,000 shares in Oversee.net, $250,000 base salary, a signing bonus of $75k, and a yearly retention bonus of $75k.

We've heard Monte's side and at some point we will likely hear Oversee.net's side of the story.  If you believe what Monte is saying, it sounds like Oversee.net never really intended to pay the incentive, and that they essentially "moved the goalpost," changing his job in such a way that he could not make the numbers.  If there is any moral to this story it may be to steer clear of overly-creative incentive plans.

The leadership at Oversee.net undoubtedly understood that Moniker was much less valuable without Monte Cahn. Monte's radio show "Domain Masters" was the first Internet radio show and podcast to focus on the domain industry.  Monte and Moniker led the way in locking down domain names so that nobody could steal them.  We'll see if this suit gets settled, but I'm sure we have not heard the last from Monte Cahn in this industry.
 
Current Recommendations:
 
Consider using Above to allow you to try domains at the parking company that pays the best.  We have seen DomainSponsor do better than other traditional parking companies on many of our domains, but Sedo still does well with international domains.  Sedo is also a great international marketplace for selling your domains.  WhyPark is a nice content-rich solution that lets you put your AdSense on the pages if you'd like. NameDrive seems to be on par with Sedo.  

Cahn had actually sold Moniker to Seevast in 2005. Oversee.net apparently approached Seevast in 2007 with an offer to buy the business.   Cahn's complaint alleges that the companies agreed to a purchase price of 35 million dollars, but Oversee required that  Cahn commit to join Oversee.net for at least three years.  The alleged "Management Incentive Plan" of up to 13 million dollars was apparently one of the major reasons for Cahn to join the company. The papers filed report that Cahn would also receive 300,000 shares in Oversee.net, $250,000 base salary, a signing bonus of $75k, and a yearly retention bonus of $75k.